Departments

Saint John's course offerings include classes in all academic subjects. Honors and advanced placement courses are available for most of these. All courses are designed to prepare students for college.

General Requirements

Academic Requirements

In order to graduate and receive a Saint John’s diploma, a student must pass (65% or better) all required courses and fulfill all academic requirements for graduation. These academic standards shall be consistent with state requirements for granting of a high school diploma. The school reserves the right to impose academic requirements above and beyond those set by the Maryland State Department of Education. The school offers several diplomas: a College Preparatory diploma, a diploma with Honors, and a diploma with High Honors.

College Preparatory Diploma

Theology (1 credit for each year of enrollment at Saint John’s) 4 credits
English   4 credits
Social Studies (including 1 credit each of Government, U.S. & World) 3 credits
Mathematics (including 1 credit each of Algebra I, Geometry, & Algebra II) 4 credits
World Language (must be continuous unless approved by administration) 3 credits
Science (including 1 credit each of Biology , Chemistry, & Physics) 3 credits
Physical Education   ½ credit
Health   ½ credit
Fine Arts   1 credit
Technology   1 credit
Personal Finance   ½ credit
Electives   1½ credit
Total   26+ credits
Beginning with the class of 2023:
  • Diploma with Honors: To be awarded a “Diploma with Honors” a student must have a weighted GPA of 3.5.
  • Diploma with High Honors: To be awarded a “Diploma with High Honors” a student must have a weighted GPA of 4.0+.
Graduating Classes of 2020-2022:
  • Diploma with Honors: To be awarded a “Diploma with Honors” a student must have at least 4 of the advanced classes listed below and a GPA of 3.0.
  • Diploma with High Honors: To be awarded a “Diploma with High Honors” a student must have at least 6 of the advanced classes listed and GPA of 3.5+.
  • Qualifying Advanced Courses:
    • Any Advanced Placement or Dual Enrollment course
    • World Language above 3rd level
    • Honors Pre-Calculus
    • Honors Organic Chemistry and Honors Biochemistry

College Preparatory Diploma with Honors Math/Science Concentration

 All requirements for College Preparatory Diploma apply with these variations:

Science (including 1 credit Biology & 1 credit Chemistry) 4 credits
Electives in Math/Science 1½ credits
Other Electives   1+ credit
Total   28+ credits

College Preparatory Diploma with Honors Humanities Concentration

 All requirements for College Preparatory Diploma apply with these variations: 

English (plus one elective course) 4 credits
Social Studies (including 1 credit each of Government, U.S. & World) 4 credits
World Language (must be continuous unless approved by administration) 4 credits
Electives  
in English, Theology, Social Studies, or World Language ½+ credits
Other Electives   1 credit
Total   28+ credits

​ Graduation Requirements

1. Students will meet all State of Maryland course and attendance requirements necessary for graduation. The State of Maryland sets “Acceptable Attendance” at 94% percent; that means students can miss no more than 10 classes in a semester course or 20 classes in a year-long course.

2. Students will meet all requirements for graduation set forth by the Archdiocese of Baltimore.

3. Students will meet all course and attendance requirements necessary for graduation as set forth by Saint John’s Catholic Prep.

4. Students will not be permitted to take examinations, participate in any graduation activities, or request official transcripts unless their financial obligations to the school have been met (tuition, uniforms, etc.).

5. Seniors must participate in an over-night class retreat.

6. In order to be considered for Class Valedictorian or Salutatorian, a student must be enrolled at Saint John’s Catholic Prep for at least two full years.

7. Participation in graduation activities is a privilege which may be denied to students due to unseemly behavior, discipline record, failure to attend graduation practice, etc.

8. Students must complete approved community service as outlined in the handbook. All students must complete 80 hours of approved community service, with 40 hours completed outside of SJCP.

Advanced Placement Courses

AP classes are taught at a higher level than normal high school classes. Ideally, they are as challenging as many freshman level college classes. For example, AP English Literature is designed to be as challenging as a freshman English class at a typical college.

The AP Exams are scored on a scale from 1 to 5, with a score of 5 being the highest. Each college determines whether or not they will accept AP credit and, if so, what score is needed. The AP exam in May allows students to potentially earn credit the opportunity to take higher level courses in their freshman year and saves money that would be invested in those beginning level courses.

At the end of an AP class offered at Saint John’s Catholic Prep, students must sit for the AP Exam in May. The fee for each exam is $94; this price is set by the College Board and must be paid by parents. By taking the exam, students have an opportunity to earn college credit for the course. In some instances, at the end of the third quarter, the AP teacher may recommend that struggling students forgo the standardized, College Board test altogether and instead opt for an in-class, AP final exam given during senior exam week.

In order to register in an AP course at Saint John’s, a student must have his/her teacher’s approval and the department chair’s approval.

Enrolling in Courses at Saint John’s

The course selections requested by students determine how the master course schedule is developed. Effort will be made to schedule students with their original course requests though some conflicts are unavoidable. Please be sure to list alternate electives on the course selection sheet.

Prior to registration, counselors will meet with each student to discuss their academic requirements and opportunities for the coming year. The student’s future college and career goals will be assessed in order to give the student every opportunity to achieve his/her goals.

After completing the course selection sheet and gaining teacher’s approval, students then submit course requests through Rediker Plus Portals. It should be understood that just because a student requests a course doesn’t guarantee that he or she will be placed in that course. Course placement depends on course availability, scheduling priorities, and departmental approvals.

In terms of scheduling, the master schedule is developed in late May. If the completed registration sheet is turned in, a tentative schedule for the coming school year will be mailed to a student in June. In some cases, students are short credits because they have incorrectly selected courses through Plus Portals or have not requested required courses. Freshmen should have seven credits listed on their schedule; upperclassmen may have up to seven credits as well.

Because of the real possibility of conflicts or student errors, it may be necessary to meet with or discuss a student’s schedule over the phone with a counselor or the administration.

Learning Inside and Outside the Classroom

English

Course Offerings

English Courses (Required/Electives)

Grade

Required Electives

9

English 9

English Honors

 

10

English 10

English 10 Honors

Publications

Creative Writing

11

English 11

English 11 Honors

AP English Language & Composition

Publications

Creative Writing

12

English 12

English 135 American Horror

AP English Language & Composition

AP English Literature & Composition

Publications

Creative Writing

English 9/9 Honors

(1 credit) 
 
This course presents an overview of Western literature from its beginning to the Renaissance using the hero archetype. Students will develop reading comprehension skills, practice literary analysis, and discover the ways ancient texts are relevant in the 21st-century classroom. They will hone effective verbal and written communication skills through incorporating the variation of sentence structure, developing paragraphs with supporting evidence, crafting sophisticated thesis statements, and practicing the basics of MLA citations.
 
Honors: Prerequisite: Department Approval 
 

Due to the rigor of an Honors level course, students are expected to conduct themselves with a higher level of self-discipline through effective time management and intellectual curiosity.

English 10/10 Honors

(1 credit)  Prerequisite: Department Approval

This course presents a historical overview of the American literary tradition. In this class, students will analyze American texts and become critical thinkers about culture and writing. Students will explore how literature shapes our concept of American life and its shared values, of community and civic engagement. They will develop and apply effective communication skills through speaking and active listening in small and large groups, and will continue advancement towards refined writing skills.  Each assignment will develop their understanding of the recursive nature of writing (prewriting, drafting, revising).

HonorsPrerequisite: Department Approval

Due to the rigor of an Honors level course, students are expected to consistently employ independence of thought and mature habits of critical thinking. Students will be expected to assume responsibility for deadlines, revising essays, and preparing for class each day. Students must exercise self-discipline when preparing for all assignments.

English 11/11 Honors

(1 credit) 

In this survey course, students will read, write, and think about European Literature—works in English and in translation—from the early modern period to today. In other words, 11th grade students will pick up where they left off in English 9, and gain a greater appreciation for the intellectual, political, and cultural heritage that has foregrounded their own. Works to be examined include those by William Shakespeare, Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Franz Kafka, and Albert Camus. 11th Grade students will focus on building for depth of writing by crafting complex sentences that express a unique voice, thoughtful paragraphs that convey unique ideas, well-researched evidence, seamless transitions, writing and fully supporting complex and well-defined thesis statements, and implementing MLA style citations consistently (with focus on mastery of the Works Cited page). Further emphasis will be given on how to read critically, and to prepare students for the expectations of college-level reading.

HonorsPrerequisite: Department Approval

Due to the rigor of an Honors level course, students are expected to consistently employ independence of thought and mature habits of critical thinking. Students will be expected to assume responsibility for deadlines, revising essays, and preparing for class each day. Students must exercise self-discipline when preparing for all assignments.

AP English Language and Composition

(1 credit - Junior Preference) Prerequisite: Department Approval

This course is constructed in accordance with the guidelines outlined in the College Board AP English Course Description. Advanced Placement English Language and Composition, a college-level writing course, is designed to develop students’ abilities as critical readers and critical writers while preparing them for the AP English Language and Composition exam in May. This class will achieve its goals through the following: analysis of non-fiction literature, rhetorical techniques, and literary devices; development of research, annotated reading, and writing process techniques; and applied grammar and vocabulary.

An AP course requires students’ best efforts consistently and emphasizes their developing independence of thought and mature habits of critical thinking. Students will be expected to demonstrate the same behavior and attitude that will be required of them as college students; this means that they will be expected to assume responsibility for deadlines, revising essays, and preparing for class discussions. Students must exercise self-discipline when preparing for all assignments. Authors whose work will be examined include (among many others): Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Ralph Waldo Emerson, Frederick Douglass, Dr. Seuss, Tim O’Brien, Truman Capote, and Harper Lee.

English 12

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Department Approval

This course is designed to help students understand and analyze rhetoric and World Literature. In the first semester, students will study the basic tenets of any argument – pathos, ethos, and logos – and read some ancient and modern practitioners of these classical skills.  Students will examine some of the fallacies of argument, and go on to arguments of fact, definition, and causality, underpinning it all with Toulmin’s structure of argument.  Students will be asked to present arguments orally and in writing wherein they defend their position and rebut counter-claims.

The second semester will be devoted to works of fiction:  drama, a novel, and various short stories.  Papers will be assigned after each unit, and students will be expected to identify a theme in each work and use the rhetorical devices already learned to explore its significance.Through this lens, students will explore both societal issues and the contemporary struggles that humanity faces. Writing for this course focuses on building for depth of writing by crafting complex sentences that express a unique voice, crafting thoughtful paragraphs that convey unique ideas in a singular voice, well-researched and documented evidence, seamless organization & flow, writing and fully supporting complex and well-defined thesis statements, and implementing MLA style citations consistently across a variety of sources and subjects.

AP English Literature and Composition

(1 credit- Senior Preference) Prerequisite: Department Approval

Recommended seniors in this accelerated course study the various modes of drama (Greek tragedy, comedy, Shakespearean, satirical, and modern),the various forms and techniques of poetry through readings, and analytical discussions of works of literary merit. In addition, to practice analytical and composition skills, students undertake a number of timed writings based on the literature under study and are introduced to longer literary analysis papers focusing on Critical Theories. Vocabulary enhancement is offered, as is individualized instruction in usage and mechanics. 

An AP course requires students’ best efforts consistently and emphasizes their developing independence of thought and mature habits of critical thinking. Students will be expected to demonstrate the same behavior and attitude that will be required of them as college students; this means that they will be expected to assume responsibility for deadlines, revising essays, and preparing for class discussions. Students must exercise self-discipline when preparing for all assignments.

ENGL 135 American Horror Story

(3 college credits, 1 SJCP credit) Seniors Only

A study of American horror fiction and film, with particular emphasis on central practitioners (Edgar Allan Poe, H. P. Lovecraft, Alfred Hitchcock, and Stephen King) as well as the philosophical and cultural implications of their works.

Creative Writing

(1 semester, ½ credit) 

This elective class aims to make its students better writers of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction. Writing is about steady discipline, attention to detail, and love of the work. We want to perform skillfully and not mechanically. We wish to improvise when necessary and revel in the words. To achieve all of this, the class will concentrate on skill. By learning the basics, the class will attempt to produce both skillful and talented writing. This means students must first become better readers, which should include all assigned texts as well as outside reading. Within the boundaries of this course, students will respond to poems and stories, write creative pieces based on exercises, prompts, and homework assignments; submit work to be evaluated by their peers; and participate in class discussions.

Publications

(1 semester, ½ credit) 

This course is designed to help the students achieve proficiency in the art of producing a yearbook. Each student must request admission to the class and acceptance is established by the teacher. Each year, the yearbook is produced online.  Skills taught and reinforced include organization, time management, editing, photography, writing, design, attention to detail, delegating, and teamwork.

Teachers

Amy Baum

Teacher - English

Nathan Blanchard

Teacher - English

Catherine Hall

Teacher - English

Zachary Petersen

Department Chair - English, Teacher - English

Jill Seaman

Assistant Principal for Academic Affairs, Teacher - English

Fine Arts

Course Offerings

Art I

(1 semester, ½ credit) 

This course will focus on the basics of Art through an examination of the Elements of Art and Principles of Design. Each project will focus on at least 2 of the elements and principles and how they work together to create a successful artwork. The class will build a foundation throughout the semester in color, line, value, perspective & composition, leading into Art II. The class will complete projects in various media, including Collage, Watercolor, pen and ink, pastel & pencil.

Students will also be given an introduction to Shape vs. Form, producing at least 1 three-dimensional piece.  This will provide a strong foundation for students who wish to enroll in advanced art classes.

All projects will be infused with art history.

Art II

(1 semester, ½ credit) Prerequisite: Department Approval

This course will continue building on the elements and principles through a variety of two-dimensional projects.  Projects will be designed to help develop drawing skills using pencil, colored pencil, marker, pen and ink and charcoal.  Projects may include still life studies, landscapes, and beginning portraiture.  Students will progress into a basic painting unit and color theory.  Students will be introduced to painting techniques in both acrylic and watercolor.  This course is designed to lead into Art III. All projects will be infused with art history. Prerequisite is Art I or Department Approval.

Art III

(1 semester, ½ credit) Prerequisite: Department Approval

This course will offer advanced lessons in drawing and painting, building off of the skills taught in Art II.   The course objectives will concentrate on more advanced subjects and movements such as figure drawing and portraiture.  The projects will allow the opportunity to work in charcoal, pen and ink, pencil, colored pencil and marker.   Course objectives will also include projects in acrylic and watercolor.  Throughout this course, students will be given more creative freedom for medium choice as well as subject matters. Students will work on developing their personal style and artistic voice.  This course will serve as a precursor for acceptance into AP Studio Art. All projects will be infused with art history.

AP Art Studio

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Department Approval

The AP Studio Art: 2D Design Course is designed for students who are seriously interested in the practical experience of art and wish to develop mastery in the concept, composition, and execution of their ideas.  AP Studio Art is not based on a written exam; instead of students submit portfolios for evaluation at the end of the school year.  In building the portfolio, students experience a variety of concepts, techniques, art mediums, and approaches designed to help them demonstrate their abilities as well as their versatility with specific problem solving and ideation.  Students also develop a body of work for the concentration section of the portfolio, which investigates an idea of personal interest to them. Successful completion of this course require students to complete three portions of a portfolio Quality, Concentration and Breadth with a total of 24 images to submit in May. Art II and Art III are prerequisites to this class.

Digital Photography

(1 semester, ½ credit)

This course is designed to help students achieve proficiency in the art of digital photography.

The class is one semester long and begins with teaching photographic composition.  The students learn more than 40 techniques and styles of composing a photograph.         This knowledge is then put to use as the students are taught how to properly use their cameras and all of its functions.  Students are taken around campus on photo assignments and they begin creating photographs.  Home photo assignments are also included. The students are taught how to “manage” their pictures on a free program from Google called Picasa.  By the end of the class, each student has an in-depth understanding of what makes a “good” photograph and how to take one themselves.

Graphic Art and Design

(1 semester, ½ credit)             

This introductory course deals with controlling computer technology to produce an artistic image.  Students will learn computer illustration techniques, image manipulation and the principles and elements of art in composition.  Students will explore careers in the Graphic Design field.  Projects may include logo design, advertisements, digital illustration, typography,and photo editing.

Band I, II, III and IV

(1 credit)

The Saint John's Band is comprised of freshmen through seniors who come from varying backgrounds of musical experience. The group is non-auditioned and all are welcome. Performances include a variety of musical genres spanning pep tunes at athletic events, to spirituals and traditional songs and concert works. Performing skills covered include development of internal pulse and pitch, rhythm and note reading using musical notation, proper vocal technique, and musical expression. Students are expected to perform a number of times throughout the school year, both in school performances and in the community.

Choir

(1 semester, ½ credit)

The Saint John's Choir is comprised of freshmen through seniors who come from varying backgrounds of musical experience. The group is non-auditioned and all are welcome. Performances include a variety of musical genres spanning concert works, spirituals, and current music. Performing skills covered include development of internal pulse and pitch, rhythm and note reading using musical notation, proper vocal technique, and musical expression. 

Percussion Ensemble I-II

(1 semester, ½ credit)

Students will explore a variety of repertoire spanning from concert works for percussion ensemble to arrangements of popular music. Performing skills covered include development of internal pulse, rhythm and note reading using musical notation, proper playing technique on a variety of percussion instruments, and musical expression. Percussion I is a prerequisite to Percussion II.

Keyboard I-II

(1 semester, ½ credit)

Students will explore keyboard technique and musical performance. The class is non-auditioned and all are welcome. The class will be individually tailored to the needs of the group, and will culminate in a public performance of music learned during the course of the semester. Performing skills covered include development of internal pulse and pitch, rhythm and note reading using musical notation, proper vocal technique, and musical expression. Keyboard II is a continuation of Keyboard I. Keyboard I is a prerequisite to Keyboard II.

Music Appreciation

(1 semester, ½ credit)

This course trains the student to critically analyze different music styles.  Beginning with Gregorian Chant of the Middle Ages, students listen to recordings of various composers and learn the historical significance of their compositions related to society.  Students are required to attend two musical performances and evaluate them. The culmination of their efforts results in a final project where they write a research paper on a composer or musical genre.

Beginning Guitar

(1 semester, ½ credit)

Students will explore guitar technique and musical performance.  The class is non-auditioned and all are welcome. Enjoyment of the instrument and excitement in playing is the goal of this course. Sight reading, learning notes, and timing will be stressed. Projects including performance in guitar will be required. Performance opportunities will be available year round for the students.

Intermediate Guitar

(1 semester, ½ credit) Prerequisite: Department Approval

Student must have rudimentary technique of the instrument and be able to sight read notes or tablature. This course develops the technical and interpretative skills of the student which will enable them to proceed to more advanced works of music. These students will have juries and be expected to perform at a Saint John’s school performance.

Advanced Guitar

(1 semester, ½ credit) Prerequisite: Department Approval

Blues, rock, Celtic and classical music will be available for the student. Rock band and Swing band have performances throughout the year. Improving technique and learning a large repertoire of music will be stressed. Chordal theory will be studied and used to create music. Sight reading either the notes or tabulation is required. These students will be expected to perform. Juries will be held for a grade in this class.

Teachers

Michael Giangrasso

Teacher - Fine Arts (Music), Teacher - Technology

Bernadette Miller

Department Chair - Fine Arts, Teacher - Fine Arts

Greg Ross

Class of 1991
Teacher - Fine Arts (Music), Teacher - Social Studies

Mathematics

Course Offerings

Mathematics Courses

Grade

Courses

8
Pre-Algebra
Algebra 1

9

Algebra 1A
Algebra 1 Honors
Geometry
Geometry Honors

10

Algebra 1B
Geometry
Geometry Honors
Algebra 2
Algebra 2 Honors

11

Geometry
Algebra 2
Algebra 2 Honors
Pre-cal
Pre-cal Honors
AP Calculus AB

12

Algebra 2
Pre-cal
Pre-cal Honors
Adv. Math Honors
Topics in Math
AP Calculus AB
AP Calculus BC
AP Statistics

Algebra 1A

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Successful completion of 8th grade math course and Department Approval

This year long course covers the first half of the standard Algebra 1 course.  It provides an introduction to the language and applications of algebra, including development of the real number system, operations with integers, rational numbers, variables, mathematical expressions, linear equations, and problem solving. 

Algebra 1B

(1 credit) Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 1A and Department Approval

This course continues the study of Algebra 1.   It reviews the previous material and includes solving equations, inequalities, operations with polynomials, factoring, statistics, probability, graphs, and functions. 

Algebra 1 Honors

(1 credit) Prerequisites: Successful completion of 8th grade math and Department Approval.

Algebra 1 Honors is a standard introductory course which includes working with integers, irrational numbers, polynomials, rational expressions, equations, inequalities, systems of linear equations, and some graphing. Translating from an English sentence to an algebraic sentence is emphasized, students are introduced to probability and statistics, and word problems are assigned throughout the year.

Geometry/Geometry Honors

(1 credit) Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 1, or Algebra 1A and 1B, and Department Approval

The objectives of this course include the traditional goals of logical thinking skills, geometric relationships, and the mathematical concepts needed for more advanced mathematics classes. This course also emphasizes skills in problem solving, algebraic connections, and proof. Students will acquire knowledge of basic concepts in geometry, including triangles, polygons, circles, area, and volume.

Algebra 2/Algebra 2 Honors

(1 credit) Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 1 and Geometry and/or Department Approval 

The second year of algebra deals with a review of Algebra 1 topics and also covers the quadratic formula, complex numbers, and logarithms. The class will include the study of polynomial, exponential, rational, and logarithmic functions as well as transformational graphing. 

Precalculus/Precalculus Honors

(1 credit) Prerequisites: A grade of A or B in Algebra 2 and/or Department Approval

This course will consist of a thorough study of linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and exponential functions as well as conic sections and trigonometry including circular functions, radian measure, and the use of trig identities.  Emphasis will be on solving and graphing equations, as well as application of concepts.  Polar coordinates and vectors will also be explored.  The goal of this course is to thoroughly prepare the student for college level mathematics. A graphing calculator is required.

Topics in Mathematics

(1 creditPrerequisites: Completion of Algebra 2 and Department Approval. Cannot be taken after completion of Precalculus / Precalculus Honors.

This course begins with an SAT preparation and continues with a review of algebraic operations involving monomials, polynomials, and factoring. An investigation of the properties of real, imaginary, and complex numbers follows. Exponential functions, a review of plane geometry, trigonometry, and probability will also be studied.

Advanced Mathematics: Honors

(1 credit) Prerequisites: Completion of Precalculus/Precalculus Honors and Department Approval. A graphing calculator will be required. Advanced Math Honors is broken into 4 quarterly sections:

●      Probability and Statistics: This section will introduce students to data description methods, statistical modeling, probability, and techniques of statistical inference. Emphases are on critical reading and written and verbal communication using the language of statistics.

●      Matrices: This section will introduce types of matrices, solve systems of equations using matrices by row operations and using a calculator, evaluate determinants, use Cramer's Rule to solve systems, matrix algebra and matrix applications.

●      Mathematical Modeling: The section will develop skills in mathematical modeling through practical experience. Students will work in groups on specific projects involving real-life problems. In addition to the development of mathematical models, effective oral and written presentation of the results will be emphasized.

●      Set Theory and Logic: This section will introduce the student to elementary set theory covering basic definitions and set operations, basic connectives in propositional logic and their properties with emphasis on truth tables.  

Advanced Placement Calculus AB

(1 credit) Prerequisites: A grade of A or B in Pre-Calculus/Pre-Calculus Honors and/or Department Approval

This Advanced Placement course teaches the basic concepts of differential and integral calculus and their applications. Also included are transcendental functions. This course will prepare students to take the AP exam.  Students enrolled in this course must sit for the AP exam in May.

Advanced Placement Calculus BC

(1 credit) Prerequisites: Successful completion of Calculus AB and Department Approval

This course reviews basic limits, derivatives and integrals, and then expands on their applications. It covers L’Hôpital’s Rule, improper integrals, partial fractions, series, vectors, and parametric and polar functions. Students will be prepared to take the AP exam. Students enrolled in this course must sit for the AP exam in May.

Advanced Placement Statistics

(1 credit) Prerequisites: successful completion of Algebra II Honors and Department Approval

The purpose of this Advanced Placement course in statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.  Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. This course will be equivalent to an introductory, non-calculus based, college course in statistics typically required for majors such as social sciences, health sciences, and business. Science, engineering, and mathematics majors usually have to take an upper level calculus-based course in statistics, for which the AP Statistics course is effective preparation. Students enrolled in this course must sit for the AP exam in May.

Introduction to Personal Finances

(1 semester, ½ credit) Prerequisite: successful completion of Algebra 2/Algebra 2 Honors

This is a required course for all students, taken junior or senior year and is an introduction to personal finances using bank accounts, checking accounts, credit, investments, different types of loans, and a budget. The course will look at managing money and making sound financial decisions. This course can not be used as a senior mathematics credit.

Teachers

Susan Belmar

Teacher - Mathematics
School: ext. 112

Ann Coughlin

Teacher - Mathematics

Wayne Rousculp

Department Chair - Mathematics, Teacher - Mathematics

Meg Thomas

Teacher - World Language (Mandarin) / ESL, Teacher - Personal Finance, Teacher - Social Studies

Jean Trettel

Department Chair - Mathematics, Teacher - Mathematics

Physical Education

Course Offerings

Physical Education

(1/2 credit) 

Incoming freshmen will complete the PE and Health credit in the 9th grade.

Physical education is an integral part of a student’s total educational program. The physical education curriculum provides a planned sequence of learning experiences in which human movement concentrates on the individual’s maximum physical potential and the related social, emotional, and intellectual growth. The Health Education program is an integrated part of the Physical Education course of study.

Health 9

(1/2 credit) 

Health Education provides students with an awareness of health standards for living including bodily functions and develops a conscious awareness of contemporary problems which affect general health and well being.  The Physical Education program is an integrated part of the Health course of study.

Team Sports

(1 semester, ½ credit)

This elective course provides students and athletes with the opportunity to develop skills in a variety of sport activities and to build foundations for a quality lifestyle.

Weight Training

(1 semester, ½ credit)

This elective course provides students with the opportunity to improve muscle strength and weight control while gaining an understanding essential to developing a basic weight training program.

10th, 11th & 12th Grade Physical Education

(1 semester, ½ credit)

This elective course provides student with the opportunity to develop skills, including physical development in the areas of strength, flexibility, coordination, endurance, balance, agility, range of motion, and power.

Teachers

Stuart Wilson

Teacher - Physical Education, Boys' Basketball (Varsity) - Head Coach

Science

Course Offerings

Science Courses (Required/Electives)

Grade

Required

Electives

9

Biology

Biology Honors

 

10

Chemistry

Chemistry Honors

Sports Medicine Nutrition Science

Anatomy & Physiology

11

Physics

Physics Honors

AP Biology

AP Chemistry

AP Env Science

Honors Organic Chemistry

Intro to Sports Med

Nutrition Science 

12

 

AP Physics I

AP Biology

AP Chemistry

AP Env Science

 Honors Organic Chemistry

Honors Biochemistry

Intro to Sports Med

Nutrition Science

GNSCI 150-5

Biology/Biology Honors

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Successful completion of 8th grade Science and Department Approval

This course covers life from the molecular level of the cell through the human organism. In addition to cell biology, topics studied include cellular respiration, genetics and protein synthesis, evolution, and the Kingdoms Plantae and Animalia. Lab work is stressed.

Chemistry/Chemistry Honors

(1 credit) Prerequisite:  Algebra 1

Honors: Algebra 1 and Department Approval

Chemistry is the study of the properties and the behavior of matter. In this course, laboratory experiences are integrated into the material.  Topics covered include: atomic structure, interactions between atoms and molecules, chemical quantities, chemical reactions, solution chemistry, and acid-base chemistry.  

Physics/Physics Honors

(1 credit) Prerequisites:  Chemistry, Geometry, Algebra 2 (concurrent)

Honors prerequisite:  Chemistry, Algebra 2, Pre-Calculus (concurrent), and Department Approval

Students study the principles and laws governing the behavior of the inanimate world around us. Knowledge is gained through experimentation, reasoning, and mathematical analysis. The course will cover the concepts and mathematics behind the natural laws which explain the behavior of forces, motion, work, energy, electricity, light, sound, and modern physics. Development of appropriate lab, computer, and calculating abilities will be an integral part of the course. Recommended for all students anticipating a career in science, engineering, or science related areas.

Advanced Placement Physics I

(1 credit) Prerequisites: Physics, Pre-Calculus, and Department Approval

This course is a 2nd year physics course intended for students with an interest in engineering or science. Strong emphasis is placed on inquiry-based learning and solving a variety of challenging problems. The subject matter is principally classical mechanics; equivalent to a first-semester college physics course. This course can lead to the opportunity to pursue and receive credit for college level work by successfully taking the advanced placement exam in physics at the end of the course.

Advanced Placement Biology

(1 credit) Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry (concurrent), and Department Approval.

The AP Biology course is a national program that gives high school students the opportunity to experience a college level course and to take the AP exam for college credit. General course topics include chemistry of life, cell, cellular energetics, heredity and evolution, organisms, populations, and ecology. The course will examine chemical processes essential to life, structure and functions of organisms, causes of adaptations. This course will teach students how to identify relationships and apply concepts rather than simply to memorize facts. The format for AP Biology is lecture and laboratory.  Students enrolled in this course must sit for the AP exam in May.

Advanced Placement Chemistry

(1 credit) Prerequisites: Chemistry, Pre-Calculus (concurrent) and Department Approval

AP Chemistry is designed to be the equivalent of the general Chemistry course usually taken during the first year of college. Successful completion of the AP examination at year's end may allow students either to undertake second year Chemistry courses in the freshman year or to fulfill lab science requirements and free time for other courses. General topics include Evidence for the existence of atoms, Chemical bonding, Nuclear Chemistry, Gases and gas laws, Solutions, Reaction types, Stoichiometry, Equilibrium, Reaction Kinetics and Thermodynamics. The course will include both lecture and a laboratory program which will expect the student to think analytically and reduce problems to identifiable, answerable questions.

Advanced Placement Environmental Science

(1 credit) Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry (concurrent) and Department Approval

AP Environmental Science is divided into two parts. The first part examines how nature operates through the creation and recycling of various substances and the interrelationships of various species of plants and animals. The second part of the course is the effect that humans have on their environment. The topics covered include carbon and nitrogen cycles, food chains, sources of pollution and the fate of pollutants in the environment, population and resource management and dynamics, waste management and recycling, water resources and pollution as well as climate change and ozone depletion. The course will have a lab component, and many important topics will be debated in team format.

Nutrition Science

(1 semester, ½ credit) Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry (concurrent) 

This course is the study of the nutrients in foods and how the body handles each of these nutrients. Mendel defined nutrition science as "the chemistry of life", where the process by which food components are digested, converted and utilized is analyzed and understood chemically for better life management. Students who apply what they learn about food and its effects on their bodies may develop a healthier lifestyle and an improved future.

Introduction to Sports Medicine

(1 semester, ½ credit)

This course is to provide students with an overview of the fields of anatomy, physiology, and sports medicine.  This course will breakdown various regions of the body on vascular, muscular, and skeletal levels.  A variety of teaching methods will be utilized and the coursework will cover basic anatomy, physiology, nutrition, evaluation of injuries, and professional preparation. 

Honors Organic Chemistry

(1 semester, ½ credit) Prerequisite: grade of an A in Chemistry or a B or better in Honors Chemistry and Department Approval

This course provides a study of theories, principles, and techniques in organic chemistry.  Topics include nomenclature, structure, properties, and reactions of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, ethers, carbonyl compounds, carboxylic acids, and amines.  Laboratory experiments will reinforce the principles of the course.  Students will be prepared for college organic chemistry courses.

Honors Biochemistry

(1 semester, ½ credit) Prerequisites:  Honors Organic Chemistry and Department Approval

This course builds on and applies concepts of organic chemistry to biological systems.  Topics will cover the structure and function of biomolecules including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, as well as cell structure, and mechanisms of biochemical processes with a focus on enzymes and metabolism.  Students will conduct experiments using biochemical techniques and construct biochemical models.  Students will be prepared for college biochemistry courses.

GNSCI 150-5 Applications of Network Science

(4 credits, 1 SJCP credit) Seniors Only

We interact with networks every day. This includes social networks, the internet, transportation grids, and many other networks. This course will introduce the new science of networks. Students will learn the technology used to build and analyze networks and their real-world applications. Topics include the mathematics of networks, application to biology, sociology, technology and other fields, and their use in the research of nature and manmade systems. Students will apply their knowledge to real world networks.

Teachers

Meghan Gray

Athletic Trainer (R2P)

Amy Katz

Teacher - Science

Steve Nigida

Teacher - Science

Brian Nogay

Teacher - Science

Erin Smith

Department Chair - Science, Teacher - Science

Social Studies

Course Offerings

Social Studies Courses (Required/Electives)

Grade

Required

Electives

9

World History

World History Honors

 

10

US History

US History Honors

AP European 

Civil War

World War II

11

Government

AP Government

AP US History

AP Macroeconomics

AP Psychology

Civil War

World War II

Intro to Psychology

Business Management

12

 

US Government and Politics

AP US History

AP Government

AP Macroeconomics

AP Psychology

Civil War

World War II

Intro to Psychology

Business Management

CJUST 110 Introduction to Criminal Justice

SOC 100 Foundations of Sociology

Modern World History / Modern World History Honors

(1 credit)

This course surveys a wide range of history beginning with the empires of Africa, feudal Europe and Eurasia during the High Middle Ages through to the Cold War and the global economy. Special emphasis focuses on major cultural traditions, historical forces, and dynamic turning points that have affected the human condition from the emergence of the modern state through the scientific revolution, age of enlightenment and exploration, industrialization and globalization.  Modern World History introduces students to the study of original source documents. Students use a textbook as well as source writings and non-written material to begin to develop a direct understanding of the way historians interpret and analyze evidence. Analytical writing assignments begin to develop the skills necessary to complete a well-documented essay by the end of the year.

Honors: Prerequisite: Department Approval

Honors Modern World History is an enriched and accelerated instructional environment designed to prepare students to take honors level history classes.  In addition to the period surveyed in other Modern World History sections, the Modern World History honors sections accelerate coverage of material to permit the introduction of historiography. Students participate in more far-ranging discussions that involve a wider selection of readings.  Honors-level writing assignments develop the ability to write well-documented essays more frequently.  

US History/US History Honors

(1 credit)

A survey of United States political, social and economic history from 1850 to the present. Major topics of study include Civil War, Reconstruction, the Second Industrial Revolution, the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, World War I, the Great Depression and the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement and the War on Terror. Special attention is given to the skills of critical analysis of primary source material, contextualizing complex historical events, and synthesizing findings into a variety of projects and outcomes.

Honors: Prerequisite: Department Approval

Honors U.S. History is an enriched and accelerated instructional environment designed to prepare students to take AP level history classes.  The honors students accelerate coverage of material to permit for an in depth research paper on Maryland history using primary sources.  Students participate in more far-ranging discussions that involve a wider selection of readings.  Honors-level writing assignments develop the ability to write well-documented essays more frequently.  

US Government and Politics

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Department Approval

American Government is a senior course that will conduct an in-depth analysis on the overall structure of American government from its inception in 1781 to present day. The course will focus on the three main bodies of government as well as critique the rolls and checks and balances that each possess. The Question as to whether America remains a true Popular Will democracy will be answered and students will engage in numerous exercises to examine the validity of this democracy. Has America truly benefited from the roles that democracy has set forth, or, as the quote explains, has it only created a government of achievements that has been less than appealing?

Advanced Placement European History

(1 credit) Prerequisite:  Department approval

AP European History focuses on major themes in European history from the Renaissance to the present. In addition to overviews of factual information, special attention is given to the political, social religious, artistic, and economic trends throughout this time period. Students are expected to recall and identify these events while also noting how these trends and narratives developed through history and continue to define modern-day society. Students will also be introduced to the concept of historiography and be exposed to how present-day event can shape the interpretation of the past. 

Advanced Placement United States History

(1 credit) Prerequisite:  Department  approval

This course is a survey of the history of the United States from 1492 to the present, focusing on the significant political, social, religious, and economic trends in American history and the relationships of continuity and change, periodization, comparison and contrast. Special attention is given to utilizing historical thinking skills and composing high-quality historical synthesis in preparation for the AP Exam in May.

Advanced Placement Government

(1 credit) Prerequisite:  Department approval

AP Government is a college level introductory course on United States Government and Politics.  This course will focus on the Constitution; political beliefs and behaviors; political parties, interest groups, and mass media; the Congress, presidency, bureaucracy, and the federal courts; public policy; and civil rights and liberties.  Course material will be taught through a variety of means including: lecture and note taking, class discussion, intensive reading, group and individual projects, and current events.

Advanced Placement Macroeconomics

(1 credit) Juniors and Seniors Prerequisite: Department Approval

Intensive in both reading and logical thinking skills, this course is not recommended for students who are not strong in these areas. The AP course in macroeconomics gives students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. Such a course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination, and also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics.

Civil War

(1 semester, ½ credit)

This course is comprehensive study of one of the most defining moments in United States history, The American Civil War.   Students will gain an appreciation of all sides of the war and an in-depth understanding of the events that shaped the ever changing American landscape.  The course is designed to help the students achieve academic excellence in reading and critically analyzing primary source documents in order to gain a full appreciation of the depth of the Civil War.  Students will be required to write three major essays throughout the course of the year.  Students will be trained to define key events and figures.  They will explain concepts and ideas individually and within a group or panel.  They will be required to categorize information provided by primary sources and to evaluate the war and its affect socially, politically, economically, diplomatically, artistically, religiously and scientifically on America. 

World War II

(1 semester, ½ credit)

A worldwide study of the Second World War. Specific areas of examination will be: World War I, the Rise of Totalitarianism, the European Theater, the Pacific Theater, the American Home Front, the Holocaust and other War Crimes, the Atomic Bombs, and the Nuremberg and Tokyo Trials. This class will also pay special attention to the construction of popular memories surrounding the war through an examination of World War II memorials and cinema. Guest speakers could include Holocaust survivors, weapons experts and war veterans.

Introduction to Business Management

(1 semester, ½ credit)

This course will assist the students in developing leadership skills and understand the concept of management. The use of various management techniques that are used in the modern business environment will be explored. The students will also learn about the various career opportunities available in the business world of today, and will also become familiar with the course of study involved in pursuing business studies at the university level. The course will include the history of business management and business theory,traits of good business leaders, project management,  and entrepreneurship.

Human Geography

(1 semester, ½ credit) 

Human Geography is a one semester course that introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Human geography incorporates the concepts and methods associated with several of the disciplines within the social sciences, including economics, geography, history, and sociology. The course topics include the following: population trends, cultural patterns and processes, agriculture and rural land use, industrialization, and city and urban land use. 

Introduction to Psychology

(1 semester, ½ credit)

Intro course introducing modern psychology by presenting scientific and humanistic interpretations of the human mind and behavior. Topics to be covered are: biological and environmental bases of behavior, motivation, sensation and perception, learning, personality and social influences.

Advanced Placement Psychology

(1 credit-- Juniors and Seniors) Prerequisite: Department Approval

The purpose of the AP course in Psychology is to introduce the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Included is a consideration of the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. Students also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice, as well as conduct their own original research.  Topics would include a history of psychology, discussion of research methods, the biological bases for behavior, perception and consciousness, learning and abnormal behavior, among other topics. The goal would be to cover what is typically found in a university level Introduction to Psychology (Psych 101) course.

CJUST 110 Introduction to Criminal Justice

(3 college credits, 1 SJCP credit) Seniors Only

A general introduction to the three components of the American justice system: the police, the courts and corrections. Special emphasis on the historical development, procedures, problems and directions for reform of each component.

 

SOC100 Foundations of Sociology

(3 college credits, 1 SJCP credit) Seniors Only

A course designed to place sociology’s development as a social science in the evolution of Western thought; it will also cover the elements of social scientific thinking. Major emphasis will be given to the analysis of culture, social structure, socialization, institutions, social inequality and social change. This course fulfills the social sciences requirement for the core curriculum.

 

Teachers

Maddie McConnell

Teacher - Social Studies, Girls' Basketball - Head Coach

Phillip Mees

Department Chair - Social Studies, Teacher - Social Studies

Greg Ross

Class of 1991
Teacher - Fine Arts (Music), Teacher - Social Studies

Meg Thomas

Teacher - World Language (Mandarin) / ESL, Teacher - Personal Finance, Teacher - Social Studies

Technology

Course Offerings

Introduction to Technology

(½ credit, 1 semester) Prerequisite: This course requires the use of a school PC only.

This survey course is essentially the foundation for understanding so many different technologies today. Essential to understanding and using these technologies include: basic computer structure, design, setup and maintenance, Networking, Wi-Fi, the Internet, Computer language (tagging and programming), Web page design, the Cloud, Cyber Security, 3D printing and Robotics. This class will encourage independent study, directing students to learn how to best incorporate technology into their educational environment. Lastly, students will be encourage to consider specific aspects of technology as a career.

Introduction to Computer Science - Python

(½ credit, 1 Semester) Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra 1, Department Approval, and the use of a school PC only.

This course is designed to offer an introduction to computer science. Students will learn the basics of computer programming along with the basics of computer science. The material emphasizes       computational thinking and helps develop the ability to solve complex problems. The course also covers the basic building blocks of programming along with other central elements of computer science. It gives a foundation in the tools used in computer science and prepares students for further study in computer science, including AP Computer Science Principles and AP Computer Science A courses.

This is an online course with faculty supervision.

AP Computer Science Principles

(1 credit) Prerequisite: completion of Algebra 2 preferred, Department Approval, and the use of a school PC only.

AP Computer Science Principles (AP CSP) is a full-year, rigorous course that introduces students to the foundational concepts of computer science and explores the impact computing and technology have on our society. The course covers a broad range of foundational topics including: programming, algorithms, the Internet, big data, digital privacy and security, and the societal impacts of computing.

This is an online course with faculty supervision.

Podcasting

(½ credit, 1 semester)

In video production class students will learn the process of editing video with Windows Movie Maker.  While learning to do video editing, the students will be exposed to the terminology associated with video editing and the importance of teamwork.  Students will learn how to map their productions, while learning the importance of clarity in the video production process.  In video production class, projects will vary from broadcasting assignments to short films. The projects will always adhere to copyright laws and standards.

Video Production

(½ credit, 1 semester) In video production class students will learn the process of editing video with Windows Movie Maker. While learning to do video editing, the students will be exposed to the terminology associated with video editing and the importance of teamwork. Students will learn how to map their productions, while learning the importance of clarity in the video production process. In video production class, projects will vary from broadcasting assignments to short films. The projects will always adhere to copyright laws and standards.

Teachers

Michael Giangrasso

Teacher - Fine Arts (Music), Teacher - Technology

Joseph Jancuk

Department Chair - Technology, Teacher - Theology, Teacher - Technology

Theology

Course Offerings

Theology Courses (Required/Electives)

 

Grade

Required

Electives

9

Theology I

 

10

Theology II

 

11

Theology III

 

12

Electives

Church History

World Religions

Faith In Action

Social  Justice

 

Theology I

(1 credit) This is a required course for freshman.The goal for freshmen in Theology I is to describe the setting and content of the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament) and then to explain their meaning. Students will comprehend two levels of meaning: first, what the inspired authors intended to convey to the people of their time, and second, what the Scriptures mean for us today, with emphasis on moral behavior and the fruits of violence. The second part of the course, prayer and liturgy, focuses on people’s relationships with God today. The theme of the entire course is “The living God gathers a people to himself.”

Theology II

(1 credit) This is a required course for all 10th graders. This course provides sophomores a scholarly introduction to the Christian Scriptures (New Testament). The life, message, and significance of Jesus the Christ are explored through a critical reading of the four Gospels, the Acts of the Apostles, the Epistles, and Revelation. Specific areas of study include: sin and redemption, Jesus as Son of God, Son of Mary; the teachings and miracles of Jesus; discipleship; the Last Supper and the Eucharist; the Passion, Death, and Resurrection; Pentecost and the mission of the Church, Christian leadership, and the moral and spiritual values of the early Church. Extended reading from the Christian Scriptures is foundational to this course.

Theology III

(1 credit) This one year course introduces the student to Catholic morality and social teachings. The student will learn in the first semester the core elements applicable to moral decision making. This includes the teachings of Jesus Christ and the Church, the formation and use of conscience, the nature of sin, virtues and vices, and the process of decision making. The second semester will deal with morality in a social context. The student will learn the doctrines of Catholic social teachings and how they are applied in the world. The principles of morality will be applied to the social issues of our time. Students will examine and question institutions, programs, governments and Church teachings in regard to issues of injustice, oppression, marginalization and the pursuit of the common good for ourselves, communities, state, country and planet.

Church History

(1 semester, ½ credit- Seniors Only) This one semester course follows the growth and development of the Catholic faith from the death of the Apostle Paul to the present age. Six models of the Church (Body of Christ, Herald of Good News, Institution, etc.) provide a framework to understand the various circumstances and events faced by the Church through its 20 centuries of existence. Other Christian traditions are considered in their historical context. Using the models of the Church, students determine how the Church has responded to challenges in the past, then draw lessons applicable to the challenges of today. The course attempts to detect the role of the Holy Spirit working through ordinary people, clergy, and designated leaders to grow and shape the Church and to inspire and guide its work in the world.

World Religions

World Religions (1 semester, ½ credit- Seniors Only) This one semester course is a survey, analysis, and comparative study of the major World Religions. Objective is to enable students to distinguish one religion from another and to identify common beliefs between other faiths and Christianity.

Faith in Action

(1 semester, ½ credit - Senior Internship) This is an approved internship in which a senior can obtain Theology credit. In the internship the student will be able to put what they learned about their faith over the last three years into action to help spread the teachings of Jesus Christ and build up their faith and the faith of others in their parish communities. Examples would be assisting in teaching Confirmation classes, assisting in Youth Ministry courses, aiding in catechesis classes K-6 grades. Other activity could include but not limited to doing work for the St. Vincent de Paul Society, Catholic Charities and Food Banks. All internships need to be preapproved and a final assessment will need to be completed in order to obtain credit.

Social Justice

(1 semester, 1⁄2 credit- Seniors Only) ) This one semester required course for seniors moves into the study of Catholic Social Teaching as it relates to fundamental issues of human rights and social justice. Emphasis is on a Christian response to global problems of war and peace, wealth and poverty, plenty and hunger, resources and work, population and urban life, escalating violence, and environmental stewardship. Students are expected to have daily access to a Catholic Bible.

Teachers

Joseph Jancuk

Department Chair - Technology, Teacher - Theology, Teacher - Technology

Robert Krajewski

Department Chair - Theology, Teacher - Theology

Dawn Miller

Teacher - Theology, Music Minister

Kate Quinn

Director of Campus Ministry, Teacher - Theology

World Languages

Course Offerings

World Languages Courses (Required/Electives)

Grade

Required

Electives

9

French 1

Latin 1

Spanish 1

 

10

French 2

Latin 2

Spanish 2

American Sign Language 2

Mandarin 2

 

11

French 3 / 3 Honors

Latin 3 / 3 Honors

Spanish 3 / 3 Honors

American Sign Language 3

Mandarin 3

Chinese Cultural Studies

French Cultural Studies

Intro to ASL and Deaf Culture

Japanese Cultural Studies

12

French 4 Honors

AP French

Latin 4 Honors

AP Latin

Spanish 4 Honors

AP Spanish

Chinese Cultural Studies

French Cultural Studies

Intro to ASL and Deaf Culture

Japanese Cultural Studies

French 1

(1 credit) This year-long course aims to develop the fundamental skills of listening, speaking, and an appreciation of the culture(s) of the people(s) who speak French, along with the skills of reading and writing. Students are immersed in authentic communicative activities. Extensive additional materials are used to enrich and enhance the learning process, including videos, CD’s, visuals, games, songs, and Internet activities. Students are exposed to various aspects of the French-speaking world and are active participants in the learning process through paired and group activities

French 2

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Successful completion of French 1 and Department Approval

This course will continue to develop the four language skills; building on the foundation acquired in French 1. Emphasis is placed on communication skills, focusing on producing and interpreting oral and written communication. Students will be expected to communicate clearly in writing, in an appropriate and accurate manner. Culturally authentic readings and videos are used to increase students’ global awareness, enhance students’ language capabilities, and serve as a basis for discussion. Role-playing and other communicative activities will enable students to practice the target language in a variety of situations.

 

French 3

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Successful completion of French 2 and Department Approval

This course refines the competence acquired in previous courses and emphasizes communication in French. Grammatical structures previously learned are reinforced, and more complex structures and expressions are introduced. Intermediate reading texts, simple poetry, short stories, Internet materials, films, and other authentic materials are used to refine the student's’ reading ability. Opportunities, such as blogs and podcasts, are provided for students to strengthen their spoken and written abilities.

French 3 Honors

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Completion of French 2 with a final grade of 85+ and/or Department Approval

The focus of the course is to provide students with the skills they need to create language for communication. The students continue their study of French from the introduction of new material, through reinforcement, evaluation and review, presentations, exercises and activities, all of which are designed improve student expertise across the three modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational). The French 3 Honors course explores more deeply the nuances of the language, instills in the students an awareness of a powerful culture, discusses economic and political topics, makes a historical connection with the world, offers and analyzes selections from various literary periods and movements related to them, and encourages the students to use their critical thinking skills to make inferences and organize their learning into a coherent “big picture” of today’s world. This course is designed to meet the needs of students who are interested in the advanced study of French grammar, conversation, literature, history, and culture. Assessments in this class include Integrated Performance Assessment (IPA) methods, in addition to traditional ones.

French 4 Honors

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Completion of French 3 or French 3 Honors with a final grade of 85+ and Department Approval

French 4 Honors is a college prep course for students in their fourth year of study of French. All the themes that will be covered throughout the year will incorporate the 3 modes of communication (Interpersonal, Interpretive and Presentational), which are defined in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century. Students who enroll in this course should have a foundation of the workings of French language, including its grammar, with intermediate-mid competence in listening, reading, writing, and speaking which are defined in the ACTFL Standards for French. Students will use Thèmes textbook along with other authentic materials and resources to enhance language acquisition and cultural learning. Students will do extensive research assignments using current and relevant resources online.

Advanced Placement French

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Completion of French 3 Honors with a final grade of 85+ and Department Approval

Students who enroll in the Advanced Placement Program in French Language should already have a good command of French grammar and vocabulary and have competence in listening, reading, speaking and writing, although these qualifications may be attained in a variety of ways, it is assumed that most students will be in the final stages of their secondary school training, and will have substantial course work in the language. This is an advanced level course with major emphasis upon spoken language, the extension of literary and cultural experiences, and reading for comprehension. It also includes a thorough review of the essentials of French grammar. It requires considerable self-discipline. Students enrolled in this course must sit for the AP exam in May.

Latin 1

(1 credit) This course is designed for students with little or no background in Latin. Students will gain a foundation in Latin grammar and vocabulary as they increase their competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Likewise, they will develop a deeper understanding of inflected language, grammar, and word formation. Additionally, students will develop a working knowledge of ancient Greco-Roman civilization through studies of its language, history, and culture. As such, students will gain insight into the workings of the modern day world through an acquaintance with the classical civilizations to which we owe much in 30 our laws, literature, language, medicine, and more. Major topics of instruction include: the 1 st -3 rd declensions; present, imperfect, future, perfect, pluperfect, and future perfect tenses; the imperative mood; comparison of adjectives and adverbs; the Roman monarchy and early republic; Greco-Roman gods and goddesses

Latin 2

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin 1 and Department Approval

This course is designed for students with a basic understanding of the fundamentals of Latin, equivalent to one year of formal Latin instruction. Students will continue their study of the Latin language and increase their competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, while immersing themselves in the study of ancient Greco-Roman civilization. Students will refine their skills of Latin composition and translation and build a stronger Latin vocabulary base through a reading approach. Finally, students will continue to develop their insights into the workings of the modern day world through an acquaintance with the classical civilizations to which we owe much in our laws, literature, language, medicine, and more. Major topics of instruction include: the 4 th -5 th declensions; the passive voice; participles; the Roman Republic; Greco-Roman heroes and mythology

 

Latin 3

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin 2 and Department Approval

This course is designed for students with a strong foundation in Latin, equivalent to two years of formal instruction. Students will continue their study of the Latin language and increase their competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, while immersing themselves in the study of ancient Greco-Roman civilization. Likewise, students will apply their knowledge of Latin to the reading and translation of complex passages of Latin. Moreover, they will continue to develop their insights into the workings of the modern day world through an acquaintance with the classical civilizations to which we owe much in our laws, literature, language, medicine, and more. Major topics of instruction include: the subjunctive mood; the ablative absolute; gerunds and gerundives; literary devices; the late Republic and Early Empire; the Roman Calendar; the Roman Army and Legionary Fortress; mythological couples and transformations

 

Latin 3 Honors

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Completion of Latin 2 with a final grade of 85+ and Department Approval

This course is designed for students with a strong foundation in Latin, equivalent to two years of formal instruction, particularly students interested in pursuing a fourth year at the advanced placement level. Students will complete their studies of grammar and classical civilization as detailed under the Latin III curriculum in addition to reading, translating, and analyzing authentic Latin texts of prose and poetry by authors such as Ovid and Caesar.

Latin 4 Honors

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Completion of Latin 3 or Latin 3 Honors with a final grade of 85+ and Department Approval

This honors level course is designed to address the needs of students who seek an alternative fourth level of Latin study. The class focuses on translation and literary analysis of Latin prose and poetry, specifically Caesar’s De Bello Gallico and Vergil’s Aeneid. Students will apply their knowledge of Latin to the reading, translation, comprehension, and literary analysis of authentic Latin texts. Students will be able to recognize and comment upon the grammar, syntax, style, and literary techniques employed by specific authors and connect the texts that they read with the people, practices, and events that shaped the ancient Roman world.

Advanced Placement Latin

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Completion of Latin 3 Honors with a final grade of 85+ and Department Approval

The fourth year of Latin focuses on translation and literary analysis of Latin prose and poetry, specifically Caesar’s De Bello Gallico and Vergil’s Aeneid, in preparation for the AP Latin Exam - students enrolled in the course must sit for the AP Exam in May. In addition to the AP College Board selections, the course will also incorporate a sight reading element taken from the texts above as well as from other authors including Cicero, Horace, Livy, Ovid, and more. Students will apply their knowledge of Latin to the reading, translation, comprehension, and literary analysis of authentic Latin texts. Students will be able to recognize and comment upon the grammar, syntax, style, and literary techniques employed by specific authors and connect the texts that they read with the people, practices, and events that shaped the ancient Roman world.

Spanish 1

(1 credit) This course is intended to introduce students to functional basic Spanish and the culture(s) of the people(s) who speak Spanish. It aims to develop the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. The present and preterit tenses are covered.

 

Spanish 2

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish 1 and Department Approval

This course begins with a review of the highlights of Spanish I. It continues the development of the four language skills with a variety of oral and printed material. The imperfect, future, and progressive tenses are covered.

 

Spanish 3

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish 2 and Department Approval

In this course, the world language skills are further developed and refined. Skills will involve active use of the language in conversation and written practice. All tenses covered in the first two years are reviewed and the imperatives are introduced.

 

Spanish 3 Honors

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Completion of Spanish 2 with a grade of 85+ and Department Approval

In this course the world language skills are further developed and refined. Skills will involve active use of the language in conversation, listening comprehension, reading comprehension and written practice. All tenses covered in the first two years are reviewed and the imperatives are introduced. This course will include the study of the subjunctive and an introduction to literature in the target language and increased instruction in the target language.

 

 

Spanish 4 Honors

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Completion of Spanish 3 with a grade of 85+ and Department Approval

This honors level course is designed to address the needs of students who seek an alternative fourth level of Spanish study. The curriculum will include conversational components, lectures, readings, long written assignments and oral presentations in the target language. The course will encompass Spanish history from the Middle Ages through the modern era, and will include historical and cultural elements. It will include a primary text, as well as ancillary materials such as videos, music, periodicals and literature in the target language. In addition, examples of Spanish and Latin American art will be integrated into the curriculum. The course will be designed to cover multiple disciplines while fulfilling the need for world 32 language instruction. Students will be expected to read, comprehend and comment on readings in the textbook and ancillary readings from various newspapers, magazines, and literature. Literature will include prose and poetry from the Middle Ages through the modern era, and will include both peninsular and Latin American sources and authors. Students will be expected to take quizzes and tests in the target language, and all writing assignments will also be completed in the target language. Students will give one oral report for each semester period, which will be weighted as a test grade, in addition to tests and quizzes.

Advanced Placement Spanish

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish 3 Honors with a grade of 85+ and Department Approval

Students who enroll in the Advanced Placement Program in Spanish language should already have a good command of Spanish grammar and vocabulary and have competence in listening, reading, speaking, and writing. The course is intended to be the equivalent of a third year college course in advanced Spanish composition and conversation emphasizing the use of Spanish for active communication. The course objectives are to comprehend formal and informal spoken Spanish, to acquire vocabulary and structure, to allow easy, accurate reading of newspapers, magazines, and literature in Spanish, to compose expository passages, and to express ideas orally with accuracy and fluency. Students enrolled in this course must sit for the AP exam in May.

American Sign Language 2

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Successful completion of ASL 1 and Department Approval

The purpose of this course is to further educate students to sign in American Sign Language. Students will continue to explore Deaf Culture while also viewing several movies and clips for further understanding of Deafness. This course will focus on receptiveness and expressive skills.

American Sign Language 3

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Successful completion of ASL 2 and Department Approval

The purpose of this course is to further educate students to sign in American Sign Language. Students will continue to explore Deaf Culture while also viewing several movies and clips for further understanding of Deafness and ASL expression. Students will also work independently on an ASL workbook where receptive skills will be tested.

Mandarin 2

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mandarin 1 and Department Approval

This course continues to educate students on the fundamentals of Mandarin. Students will focus on listening, speaking, reading and writing while continuing to explore various aspects of Chinese culture.

Mandarin 3

(1 credit) Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mandarin 2 and Department Approval

This course continues to educate students on the fundamentals of Mandarin, while increasing their vocabulary and fluency. Classes will be conducted entirely in Mandarin to the extent that it is possible. Students will focus on expanding their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills, with an emphasis on spoken Chinese.

Chinese Cultural Studies

(1 semester, ½ credit) This course is designed to give students an introduction to China through an exploration of history, culture and language. Students will get an overview of Chinese history, from dynastic to modern times, as well as be introduced to its common language (Mandarin). Students will also explore Chinese fine art, such as calligraphy and opera, as well as modern media and entertainment.

French Cultural Studies

(1 semester, ½ credit) This course is designed to give students insight into culture in everyday situations in France and Francophone countries. Students will study France’s colonial history, the ongoing relationship between France and its former colonies, and the political, security, and economic and cultural repercussions of such connections. The course will also explore different cultural subjects and themes through literature, cinema, music, theater, architecture, culinary art, societal trends and rites in France and the Francophone world.

Introduction to ASL and Deaf Culture

(1 semester, ½ credit) This course is designed to offer students insight on ASL and Deaf Culture. Students will learn about Deaf History beginning in 322 BC to present time. Students will also learn about etiquette for any Deaf encounters and learn how to communicate wisely without the usage of ASL. Students will also learn about Deafness, Deaf education, Deaf Literature, and students will be involved in several debates that still are debated within Deaf Culture. Throughout the semester, students will be watching movies and clips to further understand Deafness and Deaf Culture.

Japanese Cultural Studies

(1 semester, ½ credit) This course provides students with an introductory survey of Japan through an overview of its language, history, and culture. Students will learn how to read and write using both the hiragana and katakana systems along with select kanji. The course will also provide a brief survey of Japanese history from the Sengoku Period through modern times, while also incorporating various cultural topics such as religion and spirituality, literature and the fine arts, recreation, media and entertainment, and more.

Teachers

Marsha Flowers

Teacher - World Language (ASL)

Claudia Jamison

Teacher - World Language (Spanish)

Bernard Mambo

Teacher - World Language (French), Girls' Soccer (Varsity) - Assistant Coach, Girls' Basketball (Varsity) - Assistant Coach, Tennis - Assistant Coach

Lourdes Rubino

Teacher - World Language (Spanish)

Meg Thomas

Teacher - World Language (Mandarin) / ESL, Teacher - Personal Finance, Teacher - Social Studies

Thanh Tran

Department Chair - World Languages, Teacher - Foreign Language (Latin)